What’s the Best Substitute For Grapeseed Oil?

What do you do when a recipe calls for grapeseed oil, and you don’t have any? Or if you’re worried about its high level of omega-6 oils and just don’t want to use it. Good news: there are several substitutes to choose instead!

Bottle of grapeseed oil on counter next to bunch of grapes

Pros and Cons of Grapeseed Oil

Grapeseed oil is considered to have several benefits for cooking and health. It’s high in polyunsaturated fats, which are believed to be good for you, and has a high smoke point, making it a good choice for cooking and frying.

It’s also a good source of vitamin E, an antioxidant that helps protect cells from damage, and has been linked to improved heart health, reduced inflammation, and improved skin health. And it has a neutral taste and light texture, which also makes it great for baking.

Despite all these benefits, there are also some potential downsides to consider. First, it’s mind-bogglingly high in omega-6 fatty acids with an omega-6 to omega-3 ratio of 700:1, which can be pro-inflammatory when consumed in excess.

A diet high in omega-6 fatty acids and low in omega-3 fatty acids (found in fish, nuts, and seeds) has been linked to chronic inflammation, which may contribute to a variety of health problems. Because soy oil is in nearly every processed food and contains high omega-6, and your standard home cooking “vegetable oil” often contains mostly soy oil, most of us are eating far more omega-6 fatty acids than we realize.

Grapeseed oil is also refined, which means it has been processed using high heat and chemicals to extract the oil. This process can destroy some of the nutrients in the oil and may introduce harmful chemicals. There’s also a potential allergen concern, since it’s made from the seeds of grapes, and some people have allergies to grapes.

Fortunately there are several substitutes for grape seed oil, depending on what the oil is being used for.

Grapeseed Oil Substitutes

Canola Oil

Canola oil can be a good substitute for grape seed oil in many recipes as both have a neutral flavor and high smoke point. It’s flavor neutral and suitable for all recipes.

And its ratio of omega 6 to 3 is 2:1, which is believed to be an ideal amount for health. However, some people may prefer not to use canola oil due to concerns about its production and processing methods.

Peanut Oil

Peanut oil obviously isn’t the right choice is anyone in your household has peanut allergies. With that out of the way, peanut oil does make a good substitute for grapeseed oil because of its similarly high smoke point. It’s even great for deep frying.

Its flavor is usually neutral or sometimes slightly nutty. It’s low in saturated fat and high in unsaturated fats, including monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats, which are considered healthy fats. It also contains vitamin E, like grapeseed oil.

Rice Bran Oil

Rice bran oil has a high smoke point and neutral flavor like grapeseed oil. It’s also rich in vitamin E and has a good balance of fatty acids, making it a healthy option.

However, rice bran oil is not as widely available as grapeseed oil, so it may be harder to find in some areas.

Sunflower Oil

Sunflower oil can be a good substitute for grapeseed oil. It has a mild taste and a high smoke point, similar to grapeseed oil, which makes it suitable for high-heat cooking methods like frying, sautéing, and roasting.

While it still has a high ratio of omega 6 to omega 3 fatty acids at 40:1, it’s a lot lower than grapeseed oil.

Olive Oil

Olive oil can work as a substitute for grapeseed oil in some recipes, but note that they have different flavor profiles. Grapeseed oil has a neutral flavor, while olive oil has a distinct fruity taste.

And it has a lower smoke point than grapeseed oil, which means it doesn’t work so well for high-heat cooking methods like deep-frying. For recipes that require a neutral-flavored oil with a high smoke point, options like canola or sunflower oil may be a better substitute for grapeseed oil.

Walnut Oil

Like olive oil, walnut oil can be used as a substitute for grapeseed oil, but not in every dish. It has a strong nutty flavor that doesn’t work in every recipe.

It also has a lower smoke point than grapeseed oil, so it may not be suitable for high-heat cooking methods such as frying.

Avocado Oil

Like grapeseed oil, avocado oil has a high smoke point and neutral flavor, making it good for a variety of cooking methods, including frying, sautéing, and baking. It is also a good source of healthy monounsaturated fats and antioxidants.

Vegetable Oil

Vegetable oil is a neutral-flavored oil that can work as a substitute for grape seed oil in baking, frying, and other applications. However, it may not be the healthiest option as it is often highly processed.

Safflower Oil

Yes, safflower oil can be a good substitute for grapeseed oil in most recipes. Safflower oil is a neutral-flavored oil with a high smoke point and a high amount of polyunsaturated fatty acids.

Unfortunately, it’s not as widely available as some other oils and may be more expensive. And while it’s lower than grapeseed oil, it still has a very high omega 6 ratio of 133:1.

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Last Updated:

April 3, 2024